SS Waldensian, immigrant ship, 1878

SS Waldensian, immigrant ship, 1878
Did your people come to Canada with my people?
S.S.Waldensian (Montreal Ocean Steamship Co.)
Left Glasgow, July 21, 1878
Arrived Quebec, August 1, 1878
The Waldensian was 1407 tons. 7250 ft. It had several compartments set apart for passengers other than cabin passengers.
1.      
 Jon Gudmundsson, Labourer, single
2.       2. Bjorn Saemundsson, labourer, single
3.       Olafur Torlacius Helgason, Labourer, single
4.       Thorsteinn Kristjansson, Labourer, married
5.       Valgerdur Svensdottir, his wife, married
6.       Jon Shorsteinsson, child, single
7.       Jon Brandsson, farmer, married
8.       Margret Gudbrandsdottir, his wife, married
9.       Gudbrandur Jonsson, their child, single
10.   Askell Jonsson, their child single
11.   Kristin Jonsdottir, their child single
12.   Halflidi Gudbrandsson, labourer, single
13.   Kristjan Samuelsson, labourer, single
14.   Gudmundur Magnusson, labourer, married
15.   Helga Jonsdottir his wife, married
16.   Gudrun Gudmundsdottir, their child, single
17.   Olina Gudmundsdottir, their child, single
18.   Gudmundur Jonsson, farmer, married
19.   Thuridfur Halldorsdottir, his wife, married
20.   Gudmundur Gudmundsson, child, single
21.   Holmfridur Gudmundsdotttir, child, single
22.   Augerdur Petursdottir, occupation unknown, single
23.   Sturlaugur Gudbrnadsson, labourer, married
24.   Aslaug Gudmundsdottir, his wife, married
25.   Daniel Gudmundsson, farmer, married
26.   Arnbjorg Kristjansdottir, his wife, married
27.   Kristjan Danielsson, their child, single
28.   Adalbjartur Bjarnason, labourer, single
29.   Svein Gudmundsson, labourer, single
30.   Kristin Jonsdottir, domestic, single
31.   Gudmundur Jonsson, labourer, single
32.   Jens Sigurdsson, labouraer, married
33.   Gudrun Petursdottir, his wife, married
34.   Sigurdur Jensson, child?, 10
35.   Petera Jensdottir, their child
36.   Karolina Jensdottir, their child
37.   Johann Jensson, their child
38.   Jon Jonsson, farmer, married
39.   Sigridur Jonsdottir, his wife
40.   Thorbjorg Jonsdottir, their child, single
41.   Jon Jonsson, their child, single
42.   Kristin Jonsdottir, their child, single
43.   Helga Jonsdottir, their child, single
44.   Thordur Magnusson, farmer, married
45.   Sigurlaug Eiriksdottir, his wife, married
46.   Isak Jonsson, their child, single
47.   Gudridur Thordardottir, their child, single

Halfdanarsson Labourer, married
Sigridur Gisladottir, his wife
Eggert Eggertsson, Labourer
Sigridur Einarsdottir, his wife
Karitas Eggertsdottir, their child
Maria Eggertsdottir, their child
Indridi Hallgrimsson, farmer, married
Ingveldur Gudmundsdottir, his wife
Gudmundur Indridason, their child
Helga Indridadottir, their child
Thorolfur Gudnason, farmer, married
Una Simonardottir, his wife
Thorolfur Thorolfsson, their child
Gudni Thorolfsson, their child
Malfridur Thorolfsdottir, their child
Thorgerdur Thorolfdottir, their child
Holmfridur Thorolfsdottir, their child
Halldor Halldorsson, farmer, married
Gudrun Gudmundsdotttir, his wife
Elin Halldorsdottir, their child
Halldora Halldorsdottir, their child
Johannes Halldorsson, their child
Ingibjorg Halldorsdottir, t heir child
Sigridur Halldorsdottir, their child
Gudrun Halldorsdottir their child
Sigurlina Halldorsdottir, their child
Valgardur Jonsson, labourer, married
Kristin Jonsdottir, his wife
Kettill Valgardsson, their son
Arni Jonsson, Labourer, married
Gudlaug Eiriksdottir, his wife
Gudny Arnadottir, their child
Mensaldrina Arnadottir, their child
Gisli Eiriksson, farmer,married
Anna Einarsdottir,  his wife,
Einar Gislanson, their child
Margret Gisladottir, their child
Olafur Gislason, their child
Vilborg Gnnlaugsdottir, domestic, single
Brynjolfur Gunnluagsson, farmer, married
Halldora Sigvaldadottir,  his wife
Sigvaldi Brynjolfsson, their child
Magnus Jonsson, farmer, married
Gudbjorg Marteinsdottir,  his wife
Jonas Magnusson, their child
Sigridur Magnusdottir, their child
Josef Sigvaldsson, labourer, single
Gudmundur Marteinsson, labourer, married
Kristin Gunnlaugsdottir, his wife
Johanna Gudmundsdottir, their child
Helga Gudmundsdottir, their child
Marteinn Gudmundsson, their child
Gunnlauguer Gudmundsson, their child
Bjorg Gudmundsdottir,t heir child, this is the child who died in the sheds
Sigridur Einarsdottir, housewife, single
Edvard Thorleifsson, farmer, married
Sesselja Jonsdottir, his wife
Lara Edvardsdottir, their child
Jonina Rosa Edvardsdottir, t heir child
Kjartan Edvardsson, their child
ElinThora Edvardsdottir, their child
Lukka Edvardsdottir, their child
Kritin Edvardsdottir, their child
Sigvaldi Jonsson, labourer, married
Valgerdur Einarsdottir,  his wife
Halldor Jensson, Farmer, m arried
Sigurbjorg Fridfinnsdottir,  his wife
Kristjan Halldorsson, their child
Kristbjorg Halldorsdottir, their child
Johannes Halldorsson, labourer, married
Anna Sigurdardottir, his wife,
Leopold Sigvaldi Johannesson their child

1.       Pall Gunnarsson, farmer, married, 25
2.       Jorunn Jonsdottir, his wife, 27
3.       Adalbjorg Johannesdottir, 4
4.       Jon Gunnarsson, single, 26
5.       Palina Jondsdottir, single, 22
6.       Bardur Sigurdsson, single,25
7.       Johannes Sigurdsson, single, 15
8.       Gisli Einarsson, farmer, married, 24
9.       Elin Bjorg Gunnlaugsdottir, his wife, 35
10.   Maria Magnusdottir, sngle, 48
11.   Jakob Eiarsson, single, 12
12.   Arnbjorg Einarsdottir, single, 10
13.   Jon Folmer Hansson, labourer, married, 28
14.   Elina Jonasdottir, wife, married, 37
15.   Einar Einarsson, single, 16
16.   Svanfridur Einarsdottir, single, 13
17.   Jon Einarsson, single, 11
18.   Jonas Jonsson, single, 5
19.   Elina Jonsdottir, single, 4
20.   Sigurlaug Jonsdottir, single, 1
21.   Johann Jonsson, labourer, married, 32
22.   Gunnlaug Johannsdottir, child, 9
23.   Thorbjorg Johannsdottir, child, 5
24.   Sigrun Sigudardottir, domestic, single 18
25.   Karitas Arnadottir, wife, married, 60
26.   Jonina Jonsdottir, child, 4
27.   Halldor Jonsson, labourer, single, 34
28.   Sigurbjorn Jonsson, labourer, single, 27
29.    Sigurbjorn Hansson, farmer, married, 51
30.   Adalbjorg Jonsdottir, wife, 46
31.   Albert Sigurbjornson, single 22
32.   Sigurjona Sigurbjornsdottir, single, 20
33.   Hans K. Sigurbjornsson, single, 20
34.   Adalbjorg Sigurbjornsdottir, single, 13
35.   Jakobina Sigurbjornsdottir, single, 11
36.   Thuridur Sigurbjornadottir, single, 8
37.   Thorsteinn Sigurbjornsson, single, 5
38.   Kristjan Jonasson or Jonsson, labourer, single 19
39.   Thorkell Olafsson, labourer, married, 30
40.   Helga Thuridur Johannsdottir, wife, 22 but ?sngle?
41.   Kristjan Jonsson, farmer, married, 25
42.   Anna Thorey Arnadottir, wife, 34
43.   Johannes Kristjansson, 3
44.   Kristjan Kristjansson, 2
45.   Sigurgeir Kristjansson, 6 months
46.   Johann Sigurdsson, farmer, married, 35
47.   Johanna Jonatansdottir, wife, 35
48.   Fridbjorn Johannsson, 12
49.   Sigurdur Johannsson, 9
50.   Johan Johannsson, 7
51.   Ingibjorg Johannsdottir, 4
52.   Sigurbjorg Johannsdottir, 1
53.   Julius Johannsson, 2

1.       Kristjan Arnason, labourer, married, 30
2.       Thora Jonsdottir, his wife, 30
3.       Kristjan Julius Kristjansson, 4
4.       ARni Olafur Kristjansson, 3
5.       Jonina Thora Kristjansdottir, 6 months
6.       Jonas Halldorsson, farmer, 33
7.       Johanna Jonsdottir, his wife, 32
8.       Sigridur Jonasdottir, 8
9.       Hallgrimur Jonsson, labourer, married, 49
10.   Nyborg Jonsdottir, his wife, 48
11.   Jon Gudmundsson, labourer, single, 19
12.   Krsitjan Niels Jonsson, labourer, single, 19
13.   Johann Johannsson, labourer, married, 27
14.   Valgerdur Gudmundsdottir, his wife, 27
15.   Stefan Jonsson, farmer, married, 47
16.   Stefan jonsson, farmer, married, 46
17.   Bjorg Kristjansdottir, his wife, 47
18.   Stefan jonsson, farmer, married, 46
19.   Bjorg Kristjansdottir, hiswife, 47
20.   Jonina Stefansdottir, single, 20
21.   Sigurlaug Stefansdottir, single, 12
22.   Kjartan Isefeld Stefansson, 6
23.   Baldvin Jonsson, labourer, married, 25
24.   Arnfridur Jonsdottir, his wife, 27
25.   Jon Baldvinsson, six months
26.   Sigurbjorg Sigurdardottir, housewife, married, 67
27.   Sigurdur Kraksson, farmer, married, 24
28.   Kristin Thorsteinsdottir, his wife, 24
29.   Halldor Sigurdsson, 6 months
30.   Johann Johannsson, farmer, married, 35
31.   Gudrun Olafsdottir, his wife, 35
32.   Sigurveig Johannsdottir, 7
33.   Valdimar Palsson, single 17, different name but marked as family with Johann and Gudrun
34.   Tryggvi Palsson, 15, also marked as family with Johann and Gudrun
35.   Gisli Eiriksson, laborer, sngle, 36
36.   Gudny Sigmundsdottir, domestic, single, 37
37.   Johannes Egilsson, farmer, married, 30
38.   Sigurlaug Stefansdottir, his wife, 31
39.   Stefan Johannesson, 7
40.   Helga Johannesdottir, 1
41.   Egill Johannesson 3 months
42.   Sofanias Olafsson, labourer, single 32
43.   Arni Thorleifsson, labourer, married, 61
44.   Elisabet Jonasdottir, his wife, 50
45.   Gudrun Halldorsdottir, domestic single, 16
46.   Valdimar Jonsson, 8
47.   Arni Hallgrimsson, 7
48.   Kristjana Jonsdottir but ?Gudmundsdottir, domestic, 32
49.   Indridi Fridriksson Reinholt, labourer, single, 16
50.   Magnus Gudmundsson, labourer, single, 22
51.   Josep Josefsson? Jonssson, farmer, married, 42
52.   Sigridur Eyjolfsdottir?, child, single, 16
53.   Johann,  no last name, single, 15  Magnus, Josef, Sigurdur, Johann are marked as family unit
54.   Sigbjorn Sigurdsson, farmer, married, 31
55.   Steinunn Magnusdottir, married, 30
56.   Gudny Sigbjornsdottir, 6
57.   Gudridur Sigbjornsdottir, 4
58.   Kristjana Sigbjornsdottir, 2
59.   Sigrun Sigbjornsdottir, 13
60.   Bjorn Bjarnasson, labouarer, single, 20
61.   Eyjolfur Kristjansson, farmer, married, 53
62.   Lukka Gisladottir, wife, 45
63.   Gisli Eyjolfsson, single, 24
64.   Thorsteinn Eyjolfsson, single, 22
65.   Jon Eyjolfsson, single, 21
66.   Margret Eyjolfsson, single, 18,
67.   Sigridur Eyjolfsdottir, single, 10
68.   Sigfus Petursson, farmer, married, 37
69.   Gudrun Thnora Sveinsdottir, his wife, 33
70.   Gudrun Salina Sigfusdottir, 7
71.   Sigurbjorg Sigfusdottir, 4
72.   Gudny Johanna Sigfusdottir, 2
73.   Child? Olof Margret Sigfusdottir, Infant
74.   Gunnlaugur Magnusson, farmer, married, 55
75.   Gudfinna Vilhjalmsdottir, is wife, 47
76.   Sigurdur Gunnlaugsson, single, 13
77.   Gudfinna Gunnlaugsdottir, 11
78.   Kristin Thorsteinsdottir, 17
79.   Sigurdur Oddsson, farmer, single, 55
80.   Magnus Thorsteinsson, farmer, married, 36
81.   Vilhelmina Gudmundsdottir, his wife, 26
82.   Eyrikur Magnusson, 8
83.   Thorsteinn Erlendsson, single, 68
84.   Gudmundur Mangusson, six months
85.   Kristbjorg Thorsteinsdottir, single, 24
86.   Johann Gudnason, six months
87.   Sigurbjorn Stefansson, farmer, married, 24
88.   Sesselja Eriksdottir, his wife, 24
89.   Helga Arngrimsdottir, housewife, single, 60
90.   Gudrun Eiriksdottir, domestic, single, 22
91.   Eyjolfur Jonsson, farmer, married, 45
92.   Sigurveig Sigurdardottir, his wife, 45
93.   Gudmudur Eyjolfsson, 11
94.   Gdbjorg Eyjolfsdottir, 7
95.   Svanhvit Ejolfsdottir, 5
96.   Brgvin Kristjansson, married, 35
97.   Kristjana Bregvinsdottir, 7
98.   Runolfur Bergvinsson, 6
99.   Margret Bergvinsdottir, 4
Bjorn Jonasson, farmer, married, 29
Sigridur Sigurdardottir, his wife, 32
Steinnun Thorbergsdottir, 8
Thorbergur Thorbergsson, 8
Kristin Jonasdottir, housewife, single, 32
Jakob Sveinbjornsson, child, single, 10
Eirikur Jonsson, farmer, married, 27
Vilborg Stefansdottir, his wife, 28
Ingibjorg Gudmundsdottir, housewife, single 34
Fridrik Jonsson? Jonasson, 10
Gudni Hansson, 4
Eirika Eiriksdottir, 6 months
Bergljot Eiriksdottir, 6 months
Einar Gudmundsson, farmer,  married, 43
Gudrun Asfrimsdottir, is wife, 42
Gudmundur Einarsson, sngle 23
Halldor Sigurdsson, 12
Asmundur Eiriksson, farmer, married, 26
Eirikur Torfason, farmer, single, 30
Arnfridur Asgrimsdottir, housewife, sngle, 45
Arni Magnusson, farmer, married, 55
Ingibjorg Thorkellsdottir, his wife, 36
Arnfridur Asmundsdottir, hosewife, single, 40
Petur Gudmundsson, 12
Sigurjon Jonsson, 1
Gisli Arnason, farmer, married, 22
Gudrun Thorsteinsdottir, his wife, 22
Bjarni Gislason, farmer, 26
Kristjan Kristjansson, farmer, married, 28
Svanfridur Jonsdottir, his wife, 21
Thorsteinn Kristjansson? Einarsson, farmer, 21  KK, SJ and TK are marked as all on same ticket
Josef Helgason, farmer, married, 33
Helgi Jon Josefsson, 5
Eyjolfur Gudmundsson, farmer, married, 45
Thorunn Sigurdardottir, his wife, 44
Anna Eyjolfsdottir, 11
Jonina Eyjolfsdottir, 4
Adalmundur Gudmundsson, farmer, married, 24
Julianna Einarsdottir, his wife, 29
Johann Gunnarsson, farmer, single, 26
Jon Sigurdsson, farmer, married, two ages given, 21 and 29
Margret Gudmundsdotttir, his wife, 26
Olof Margret Jonsdottir, 2
Johannes Jonsson, farmer, single, 51
Pall Th. Thorsteinsson, farmer, single, 21
Jon Jonsson, farmer, married, 36?
Kristin or Katrin Bjornsdottir, his wife, 47?
Jon Bjarnason, 11
Josef Bjarnason? Bjornsson, farmer, married, 47
Malmfridur Hallgrimsdottir, his wife, 49
Josafat Josefsson, 12
Helga Josefsdottir, 11
Hallgrimur Josefsson, 8
Kristjan Josefsson, 6
Gudrun Josefsdottir, 3
Kristjan Eiriksson, farmer, married, 28
Ragnhildur Thorlaksdottir, his wife, 26
Einar Jonsson, farmer, married, 42
Olafia Hansdottir, his wife, 40
Sigurdur or Sigurgeir Einarsson, single, 17? Or21
Sigvaldi no last name, 15
Bjorn, no last name 3   but both these children included as “family” with Einar and Olafia
Jon Emundsson, farmer, married, 27
Jonina? Juliana Einarsdottir, his wife, 25, has child during the voyage
Eirikur Eymundsson, farmer, married, 32
Helga Jonsdottir or Johannsdottir, his wife, 32
Margret Eiriksdottir, 4
Johann Eiriksson, 2
Sigfinnur Petursson, farmer, married, 35
Sigurbjorg Sigurdardottir, his wife, 35
Oli Sigfinnsson, 15
Halli Bjornsson, 9
Jorgen Bjornsson, 19
Sigridur Bjornsdottir, 12
Eln Sigurbjornsdottir, 12
Friman? Finnujr Gjudmndsson, 8
Gudrun Sigfusdottir, six months
Sigridur Vigfusdottir, married, 41
Rosa Palsdottir, married, 19 from Halli to Rosa, the group is marked as one family
Einar Bessason, farmer, married, 54
Lilja Vigfusdottir, his wife, 54
Asbjorn Asbjornsson, labourer, single, 25
Petur Petursson, Lbourer, married, 26
Sigurveig Jonsdottir, his wife, married, 24
Gudrun Jonsdottir, hosewife, married, 62
Gudrun Petursdottir, six months
Jon Thorsteinsson, farmer, married, 54
Kristin Jonsdottir, his wife, 54

1.       Kristjan Arnason, labourer, married, 30
2.       Thora Jonsdottir, his wife, 30
3.       Kristjan Julius Kristjansson, 4
4.       Arni Olafur Kristjansson, 3
5.       Jonina Thora Kristjansdottir, 6 months
6.       Jonas Halldorsson, farmer, 33
7.       Johanna Jonsdottir, his wife, 32
8.       Sigridur Jonasdottir, 8
9.       Hallgrimur Jonsson, labourer, married, 49
10.   Nyborg Jonsdottir, his wife, 48
11.   Jon Gudmundsson, labourer, single, 19
12.   Krsitjan Niels Jonsson, labourer, single, 19
13.   Johann Johannsson, labourer, married, 27
14.   Valgerdur Gudmundsdottir, his wife, 27
15.   Stefan Jonsson, farmer, married, 47
16.   Stefan jonsson, farmer, married, 46
17.   Bjorg Kristjansdottir, his wife, 47
18.   Stefan jonsson, farmer, married, 46
19.   Bjorg Kristjansdottir, hiswife, 47
20.   Jonina Stefansdottir, single, 20
21.   Sigurlaug Stefansdottir, single, 12
22.   Kjartan Isefeld Stefansson, 6
23.   Baldvin Jonsson, labourer, married, 25
24.   Arnfridur Jonsdottir, his wife, 27
25.   Jon Baldvinsson, six months
26.   Sigurbjorg Sigurdardottir, housewife, married, 67
27.   Sigurdur Kraksson, farmer, married, 24
28.   Kristin Thorsteinsdottir, his wife, 24
29.   Halldor Sigurdsson, 6 months
30.   Johann Johannsson, farmer, married, 35
31.   Gudrun Olafsdottir, his wife, 35
32.   Sigurveig Johannsdottir, 7
33.   Valdimar Palsson, single 17, different name but marked as family with Johann and Gudrun
34.   Tryggvi Palsson, 15, also marked as family with Johann and Gudrun
35.   Gisli Eiriksson, laborer, sngle, 36
36.   Gudny Sigmundsdottir, domestic, single, 37
37.   Johannes Egilsson, farmer, married, 30
38.   Sigurlaug Stefansdottir, his wife, 31
39.   Stefan Johannesson, 7
40.   Helga Johannesdottir, 1
41.   Egill Johannesson 3 months
42.   Sofanias Olafsson, labourer, single 32
43.   Arni Thorleifsson, labourer, married, 61
44.   Elisabet Jonasdottir, his wife, 50
45.   Gudrun Halldorsdottir, domestic single, 16
46.   Valdimar Jonsson, 8
47.   Arni Hallgrimsson, 7
48.   Kristjana Jonsdottir but ?Gudmundsdottir, domestic, 32
49.   Indridi Fridriksson Reinholt, labourer, single, 16
50.   Magnus Gudmundsson, labourer, single, 22
51.   Josep Josefsson? Jonssson, farmer, married, 42
52.   Sigridur Eyjolfsdottir?, child, single, 16
53.   Johann,  no last name, single, 15  Magnus, Josef, Sigurdur, Johann are marked as family unit
54.   Sigbjorn Sigurdsson, farmer, married, 31
55.   Steinunn Magnusdottir, married, 30
56.   Gudny Sigbjornsdottir, 6
57.   Gudridur Sigbjornsdottir, 4
58.   Kristjana Sigbjornsdottir, 2
59.   Sigrun Sigbjornsdottir, 13
60.   Bjorn Bjarnasson, labouarer, single, 20
61.   Eyjolfur Kristjansson, farmer, married, 53
62.   Lukka Gisladottir, wife, 45
63.   Gisli Eyjolfsson, single, 24
64.   Thorsteinn Eyjolfsson, single, 22
65.   Jon Eyjolfsson, single, 21
66.   Margret Eyjolfsson, single, 18,
67.   Sigridur Eyjolfsdottir, single, 10
68.   Sigfus Petursson, farmer, married, 37
69.   Gudrun Thnora Sveinsdottir, his wife, 33
70.   Gudrun Salina Sigfusdottir, 7
71.   Sigurbjorg Sigfusdottir, 4
72.   Gudny Johanna Sigfusdottir, 2
73.   Child? Olof Margret Sigfusdottir, Infant
74.   Gunnlaugur Magnusson, farmer, married, 55
75.   Gudfinna Vilhjalmsdottir, is wife, 47
76.   Sigurdur Gunnlaugsson, single, 13
77.   Gudfinna Gunnlaugsdottir, 11
78.   Kristin Thorsteinsdottir, 17
79.   Sigurdur Oddsson, farmer, single, 55
80.   Magnus Thorsteinsson, farmer, married, 36
81.   Vilhelmina Gudmundsdottir, his wife, 26
82.   Eyrikur Magnusson, 8
83.   Thorsteinn Erlendsson, single, 68
84.   Gudmundur Mangusson, six months
85.   Kristbjorg Thorsteinsdottir, single, 24
86.   Johann Gudnason, six months
87.   Sigurbjorn Stefansson, farmer, married, 24
88.   Sesselja Eriksdottir, his wife, 24
89.   Helga Arngrimsdottir, housewife, single, 60
90.   Gudrun Eiriksdottir, domestic, single, 22
91.   Eyjolfur Jonsson, farmer, married, 45
92.   Sigurveig Sigurdardottir, his wife, 45
93.   Gudmudur Eyjolfsson, 11
94.   Gdbjorg Eyjolfsdottir, 7
95.   Svanhvit Ejolfsdottir, 5
96.   Brgvin Kristjansson, married, 35
97.   Kristjana Bregvinsdottir, 7
98.   Runolfur Bergvinsson, 6
99.   Margret Bergvinsdottir, 4
Bjorn Jonasson, farmer, married, 29
Sigridur Sigurdardottir, his wife, 32
Steinnun Thorbergsdottir, 8
Thorbergur Thorbergsson, 8
Kristin Jonasdottir, housewife, single, 32
Jakob Sveinbjornsson, child, single, 10
Eirikur Jonsson, farmer, married, 27
Vilborg Stefansdottir, his wife, 28
Ingibjorg Gudmundsdottir, housewife, single 34
Fridrik Jonsson? Jonasson, 10
Gudni Hansson, 4
Eirika Eiriksdottir, 6 months
Bergljot Eiriksdottir, 6 months
Einar Gudmundsson, farmer,  married, 43
Gudrun Asfrimsdottir, is wife, 42
Gudmundur Einarsson, sngle 23
Halldor Sigurdsson, 12
Asmundur Eiriksson, farmer, married, 26
Eirikur Torfason, farmer, single, 30
Arnfridur Asgrimsdottir, housewife, sngle, 45
Arni Magnusson, farmer, married, 55
Ingibjorg Thorkellsdottir, his wife, 36
Arnfridur Asmundsdottir, hosewife, single, 40
Petur Gudmundsson, 12
Sigurjon Jonsson, 1
Gisli Arnason, farmer, married, 22
Gudrun Thorsteinsdottir, his wife, 22
Bjarni Gislason, farmer, 26
Kristjan Kristjansson, farmer, married, 28
Svanfridur Jonsdottir, his wife, 21
Thorsteinn Kristjansson? Einarsson, farmer, 21  KK, SJ and TK are marked as all on same ticket
Josef Helgason, farmer, married, 33
Helgi Jon Josefsson, 5
Eyjolfur Gudmundsson, farmer, married, 45
Thorunn Sigurdardottir, his wife, 44
Anna Eyjolfsdottir, 11
Jonina Eyjolfsdottir, 4
Adalmundur Gudmundsson, farmer, married, 24
Julianna Einarsdottir, his wife, 29
Johann Gunnarsson, farmer, single, 26
Jon Sigurdsson, farmer, married, two ages given, 21 and 29
Margret Gudmundsdotttir, his wife, 26
Olof Margret Jonsdottir, 2
Johannes Jonsson, farmer, single, 51
Pall Th. Thorsteinsson, farmer, single, 21
Jon Jonsson, farmer, married, 36?
Kristin or Katrin Bjornsdottir, his wife, 47?
Jon Bjarnason, 11
Josef Bjarnason? Bjornsson, farmer, married, 47
Malmfridur Hallgrimsdottir, his wife, 49
Josafat Josefsson, 12
Helga Josefsdottir, 11
Hallgrimur Josefsson, 8
Kristjan Josefsson, 6
Gudrun Josefsdottir, 3
Kristjan Eiriksson, farmer, married, 28
Ragnhildur Thorlaksdottir, his wife, 26
Einar Jonsson, farmer, married, 42
Olafia Hansdottir, his wife, 40
Sigurdur or Sigurgeir Einarsson, single, 17? Or21
Sigvaldi no last name, 15
Bjorn, no last name 3   but both these children included as “family” with Einar and Olafia
Jon Emundsson, farmer, married, 27
Jonina? Juliana Einarsdottir, his wife, 25, has child during the voyage
Eirikur Eymundsson, farmer, married, 32
Helga Jonsdottir or Johannsdottir, his wife, 32
Margret Eiriksdottir, 4
Johann Eiriksson, 2
Sigfinnur Petursson, farmer, married, 35
Sigurbjorg Sigurdardottir, his wife, 35
Oli Sigfinnsson, 15
Halli Bjornsson, 9
Jorgen Bjornsson, 19
Sigridur Bjornsdottir, 12
Eln Sigurbjornsdottir, 12
Friman? Finnujr Gjudmndsson, 8
Gudrun Sigfusdottir, six months
Sigridur Vigfusdottir, married, 41
Rosa Palsdottir, married, 19 from Halli to Rosa, the group is marked as one family
Einar Bessason, farmer, married, 54
Lilja Vigfusdottir, his wife, 54
Asbjorn Asbjornsson, labourer, single, 25
Petur Petursson, Lbourer, married, 26
Sigurveig Jonsdottir, his wife, married, 24
Gudrun Jonsdottir, hosewife, married, 62
Gudrun Petursdottir, six months
Jon Thorsteinsson, farmer, married, 54
Kristin Jonsdottir, his wife, 54
Gudmundur Arnason, farmer, married, 50
Gudny Arnadottir, his wife? , 50
Jon Sigurdsson, farmer, married, 48
Solveig Jonsdottir, his wie, 49
Albert Julius Jonsson, single, 22
Thorunn Ag. Grimsdottir, single, 24
Gudny Albertsdottir, six months
Josef Jonsson, labourer, married, 47
Stefan Josefsson, single, 12
Arndis Jonsdottir, wife, 48
Jon Josefsson, 7
Gudrun Bjorg Josefsdottir, 5
Gudmundur Thordarsson, farmer, married, 38
Thorunn Jonsdottir, his wife, 54?
Sigridur Arnadottir, single, 22
Jonatan Arnason, single, 15
Benjamin Arnason, 12
Thordur Thordarsso, farmer, married, 48
Kristin Thorsteinsdottir, his wife, 27
Gudmundur Thordarsson, single, 25
Gudridur Thordarsdotttir, single, 14
Thordur Thordarsson, 10
Sigurbjorg Thordardottir, six months
Ana Bjornsdottir, domestic, single, 23
Sigurdur Sigurdsson, farmer, married, 36
Kristin H. Ofeigsdottir, his wife, 25
Kristrun Olafsdottir, domestic, single, 22
Jon Sigurdsson, labourer, married, 54
Metusalem Jonsson, labourer, sngle 26
Hoseas Arnason, 13
Stefan jonsson, labourer, single, 28
Bjorg Jonsdottir, domestic, single, 25
Vigfus Josefsson, farmer, married, 48
Sigurbjorg Hjalmaradottir, his wife, 52
Sigurrin Vigfusson, single, 21
Herman Vigfusson, single, 19
Sigridur Vigfusdottir, 13
Stefan Jonsson, labourer, married, 26
Solveig Jonsdottir, his wife, 21
Sigurbjorn Jonsson?, labourer, sngle, 18
Jon ? 14
Jon Sigurdsson, farmer, married, 33
Holmfridur Sigurdardottir, his wife, 21
Ingibjorg Josefsdottir, 11
Gudbjorg Josefsdottir, 9
E. Sigurdsson, farmer, married, 30?
Katrin Magnusdottir, his wife, 40?
Sigridur Jonsdottir, 13
Petur Jonsson, 5
Holmkell Josefsson, labourer, single, 20
Hoseas Josefsson, 13
Gudrun Einarsdottir, domestic, married, 37
Vilhjalmur Sigmundsson, 5?
Borghildur Sigmundsdottir, 3?
Halldor Oddsson? Vilhjalmsson, labourer, single, 20
Jon Arnason, labourer, married, 74
Jonas Jonsson, labourer, married, 26
Kristjan?, 4
Stefan Hemansson, labourer, married, 41
Stefan Stefansson, 2
-add one girl born at sea
Jonatan Petursson, farmer, married, 78
Thorunn oddsdottir, his wife, 67
Helga Jonsdottir, child? Age?
Halldora Sigurdardottir? Sigfusdottir,, 10
Jonatan Jonatansson, farmer, 34
Jon Olafsson, farmer, ?
No ticket number recorded for the following lnames:
Eirikur Eymundsson, single, 32
Sig? Jonsson, single, 26
Bjorn? Bjarni Gisalson, single, 26
Kristjan Jonasson? Jonsson, married, 19?
Margret Gudmundsdottir, married, 26?
Olof Margret Jonsdottir, 2?
Jon Bergman (Sigurdsson), single?, 29
Joef Sigvaldason, single, 19
Not on the list, two children
Gudrun Thorsteinsdottir, 12
A child, 1.5 years old

B
B

I haven’t type all the names.
There are according to this passenger list, 409 people from Iceland. No. 74 is Valgardur, labourer, married, his wife, Kristin, and Ketill, their son. These are my great great grandparents and Ketill, my great grandfather, whom I remember because when I visited him in his home on 4th ave. in Gimli, he used to give me a peppermint. Also, he had his coffin on two trestles in his basement.
The destinations for the Icelanders were 132 for Fort Garry via Collingwood and 50 via Sarnia, Ont. 105 were destined for Toronto and 9 for Halifax. 122 were destined for the Western States.
During the trip there was one child born and four people died. 2 children died during the voyage and were buried at sea. I child died in the shed. One old man on board died at the wharf. This was Jon Arnason, a labourer, married, but no wife listed, his age is uncertain but believed to be 74.
64% of the Icelandic passengers were single
43 Icelanders were between 40 and 50 years old.
22 Icelanders were 50 years or older.
My thanks to Donald Gislason of Toronto for giving me this manifest many years ago when I had supper at  his home. He said, “Oh, I nearly forgot. I’ve got your great grandfather in my filing cabinet”, jumped up and brought back this ship’s list of passengers. It was very kind of him, much appreciated then and still appreciated now.

Trollope’s picnic, Iceland,1878

Sketch by Jemima Wedderburn Blackburn (1823–1909)

In 1878, Iceland, faced with disastrous weather, recent volcanic eruption, the continuing domination of Denmark in spite of the new constitution brought to Iceland by Christian IX in 1874, was riven with conflict. Some, seeing the end of Danish rule, the actual appearance of coinage brought in payment by the English and Scottish traders who were buying cattle, the possibility of Icelanders becoming merchants and traders instead of just the providers of goods to trade in a monopoly situation, were strongly opposed to the emigration that was going on. These were the nationalists and idealists. Also opposed were the better off large landowning farmers who were seeing their cheap labour disappear and, as a result, wages, little as they were, going up. In a marginal economy with one crop, hay, even well-to-do farmers could be reduced to penury by a summer when the grass didn’t grow. Conservative, opposed to change, the dominant land owners’ solution was to keep costs as low as possible. That meant keeping the majority of the population as indentured servants. On the other hand those who had no future were determined to leave. They rode, or often walked, to the coast, waited for ships that were frequently delayed by bad weather. The conflict between those who wanted no emigration and those determined to search for a life where there was opportunity was often bitter.
In the midst of this social upheaval, the Mastiffs, Trollope says “were all engaged in frivolous pursuits of buying silver ornaments and talking to the good-natured people in the shops, – all of whom seemed to possess a little English”
John Burns, the wealthy host of the trip, was busy on his own errands. He was going about Reykjavik asking “all the greater people of the town to come and eat dinner on board the Mastiff.” Burns also decides that there should be a picnic in the afternoon of the Saturday even though the dinner is Saturday night. None of the travelers, of course, has anything to do but be presentable. The food was prepared by the on-board cook.
Trollope has mentioned before that except for curds (skyr?), milk and cream, none of the travellers try any Icelandic food. On the coming Monday, they intend to pack a hundredweight of English cooked meat and bread with them to the Geysers.
The picnic is a great success. Thora “the divine” goes with them. She’s fluent in English and can translate for them. They sail three or four miles to an island devoted to the breeding of eider ducks.
Thora leads them to the home of the owner of the island. For Iceland, he has a fine house. Trollope can’t resist a little sarcasm by saying that Icelanders all seem to like English gold and gives as an example a lot of Icelandic silver work set out on the piano that is obviously there so the English visitors will buy it. Word, it would seem, has gone ahead about the Mastiffs shopping for trinkets in Reykjavik.
Trollope says that it was while they were having their picnic that “Thora made herself so divine that our Wilson seemed altogether to succumb to her attractions.”
 According to Trollope, the picnic lunch was stupendous. However, they didn’t dally as they had to get back to the Mastiff to prepare for “the grand dinner.”
The English travellers are worldly, used to the best of everything. Their lives could probably be described as sumptuous. There is nothing in Iceland to compare with Castle Wymess or even the grand houses of the other members of the party. To these visitors, intent not on geology, politics, history, ornithology, but only on seeing the famous geysers, what must be, for them, a primitive and poor society is no more than amusing. It’s a diversion paid for by someone else. Unlike Charles Lock they are not in search of the Eddas. Of course, it is impossible to know what any of the other party members thought or felt for it is throughTrollope’s lens that everything is reported and his description is constrained by good manners and obligation.
There is probably no more telling detail of the attitude of the travellers to the Icelanders than the attitude toward Icelandic food. What was available, it is true, was limited. And, one might add, when the Danish king came to Reykjavik, the food for the banquet in the city was brought with him. However, when the reception in his honour was held at the Almannagjá, it was Icelandic food that was served him and no one mentioned that he declined.
The only items of value to the English travellers, it seems, are the bits and pieces of silver jewelry that are bought as souvenirs and, even some of these, Trollope says, may have come from the British Isles. Unlike S. E. Waller, a young painter who, inspired by the sagas, had so little money that he could not afford more than three horses and a single guide, the Mastiffs were not seeking the home of Burnt Njál. Waller travelled across Iceland to paint scenes from the sagas. Even a small amount of money would have made his travels less arduous. However, the Icelandic farmers, recognizing that he was not rich, befriended him. He learned something of the Icelandic people’s generosity and kindness. They often provided food and accommodation without charge. Nor did they charge for their precious grass. Waller came to Iceland with a deep appreciation of Icelandic literature and history. He sought, in the face of hardship, to create something of lasting value. The Mastiffs brought nothing, it seems, with them beyond English gold and took away nothing but trinkets.

Trollope at Reykjavik, 1878

The Mastiff arrives in Reykjavik early in the morning. After bathing in the ocean, the travellers go ashore. 
They first visit Governor Finsen, the Governor-General of Iceland. Trollope comments on how kindly the sixteen unexpected guests were received. The Governor also provides them with all the information required for finding a guide and horses for their ride to the Geysers. 
From there, they go to the Sheriff’s, then to the Bishop’s (http://books.google.ca/books/about/Biskop_Pjetur_Pjetursson.html?id=5OgEHQAACAAJ&redir_esc=y.) The bishop is considered Iceland’s greatest theological writer since Gubrandur Thorlaksson, the first translator of the Bible into Icelandic. He served as a member of the Icelandic Althing, or parliament, from 1849 until 1886, for the last eleven years as speaker of the upper house.
There, they meet Thora, the Bishop’s daughter. She is so beautiful, so charming, so vivacious, that she is repeatedly mentioned in Trollope’s account of their stay in Reykjavik. He even suggests, teasingly, that one of the male members of the English party has fallen in love with Thora and might return to Iceland to court and marry her.    
He says, “But at the Bishop’s we became acquainted with Thora, the Bishop’s daughter. Thora, before we left, had become to all of us the heroine of Reykjavik. Even Wilson, the unhappy one, was softened altogether by the charm and wit of Thora, and became quite devoted and almost gay in her presence.” (http://www.forlagid.is/?p=573500) A book about Thora has recently been released in Iceland. Unfortunately, it is only in Icelandic.
After these formal visits to the dignitaries of Reykjavik, they roam about town like typical tourists of today. They buy silver ornaments, silvered belts and filigree work as souvenirs. They also buy leather whips and satchels.
Fish, he notices, is spread out on every available piece of ground, that bread is rare and that the mutton (he was told) is good.
What is more interesting is that he says, “I do not think that any one of our party ate a morsel of Icelandic food during our sojourn beyond curds, cream, and milk, – unless it might be a biscuit taken with a glass of wine. Our provisions had all been brought from Scotland, and from our ship’s stores we carried with us up to the Geysers what was needed.” They ate no Icelandic lamb, no fish.
What he praises is the education of the people. However, he does not know that from his own experience. He quotes from Sir George MacKenzie who published a book about Iceland in 1811, sixty-seven years before.
“The amount of reading which certainly does prevail throughout Iceland is marvellous. There is hardly in the island what can be called an upper class. There is no rich body, as there is with us, for whose special advantage luxurious schools and aristocratic universities can be maintained. But there is a thoroughly good college at Reykjavik, with a rector and professors, at which a sound classical education is given; and there are now also minor schools….There are five newspapers published in the island, two of them at Reykjavik.”
He’s surprised that there is no bank. The result is that most commerce is based on the barter of goods. “The imports and exports are considerable, fish, oil, skins, tallow, and wool being sent away in exchange for timber, wood, tea, sugar, and all those thousand little articles of comfort which a civilised community uses every day almost without knowing it. But nothing can be imported or exported without payment being rendered in the old world fashion of barter.”
In a walk he took by himself around “the back of the town, where lies a little lake with marshy land around it, I found a number of women and children turning the peat for drying, or sending away in baskets on their ponies that which was fit, carrying on their operations very much as they do in Ireland. Fuel to them is a matter of great solicitude. During eight months of the year artificial warmth is necessary; and not only have they no coals, but neither have they wood. Coal imported from Scotland may be bought at Reykjavik; but as there is no carriage for anything through the country except on the backs of ponies, very little coal can ever be seen beyond the limits of the town.”
The Mastiffs are typical well-to-do tourists. Their accommodation is on the ship. They buy what souvenirs they can find. In Iceland, in 1878, the emigration to North America is well underway. Hunger is widespread, there’s been a major volcanic eruption, economic and social conditions are driving away what will eventually be twenty percent of Iceland’s population. There is no mention of any of it. There’s not even any awareness revealed.
It is, perhaps, instructive that Trollope made his walk around the back of the town by himself. Perhaps a writer, even one who has made himself a place among the wealthy and the prominent, has a wider interest in the world than his wealthy, privileged friends.
(Quotes from How the ‘Mastiffs’ Went to Iceland)

The Mastiff at the Faroes, 1878

Sketch by Jemima Wedderburn Blackburn (1823–1909

Trollope and his friends leave St. Kilda and head for the Faroe Islands. They are on a sightseeing junket paid by the head of Cunard Lines. They’re travelling on the yacht, the Mastiff. They hold high positions, individually, or as members of important families. They are used to life in European cities. At St. Kilda, they’ve seen what life is like in an isolated place where bare survival requires charity. Where good fortune is the gift of a few feet of rope. Now, they go to the Faroes, also isolated, but with a population of around ten thousand and circumstances that allow them to fish and farm more successfully. This visit is good preparation for when the Mastiffs  reach Iceland.
The Faroes are inextricably linked with Iceland. Numerous books about Iceland are also about the Faroes. Harper&Brothers published a book, Iceland, Greenland and the Faroes in 1841. Kneeland says in his book, Travels In Iceland, 1874, that travellers should go to Iceland via Scotland, the Orkneys, Shetlands, and the Faroes. Russell’s, Iceland, 1914, starts with a chapter on the Faroes.
The Faroes, as small as they are, were the first country to offer Iceland financial aid during the recent economic crises. In spite of that, the Faroes are often dismissed by Icelanders, brushed off with a sniff. That may be because of their size or it may be lingering resentment that the Faroes were always treated well by the Danish king. When Christian IX stopped at the Faroes on his way to Iceland in 1874, the Faroese had nothing to ask from him. No one asked for a new constitution. The population was quite satisfied with the way it was being treated. The Icelanders wanted a new constitution and independence. They’d suffered for centuries under harsh Danish law and trading monopolies that exploited them.
When the Mastiff’s passengers arrive at Thorshavn, Trollop says, “The postmaster, with a considerable proportion of the population, was there, on the rocks, to receive us.
“We were taken first to the postmaster’s house, – only, I think, because the doing so was an act of hospitality. Here we found ourselves in a very pretty room, comfortably furnished, overlooking a beautifully picturesque nook of the sea.” This would be, in Iceland, the description of a Danish trader’s house, not an Icelanders. Ida Pfeiffer, in 1845, upon arriving in Iceland describes the Danish traders’ houses this way: “If any person could suddenly and without having made the journey, be transported into one of these houses, he would certainly fancy himself in some continental town, rather than in the distant and barren island of Iceland.
She then adds, “From these handsome houses I betook myself to the cottages of the peasants, which have a more indigenous, Icelandic appearance….Throughout my subsequent journeys into the interior, I found the cottages of the peasant everywere alike squalid and filthy.”
Trollope, having landed safely and been greeted politely, says, “Then we proceeded upon a walk, a number of men and a long string of pretty maidens accompanying us. We went about among the narrow streets, – streets which are required for no wheeled vehicles, – and saw other maidens looking at us from out of the windows. These streets were not rectangular, straight, and ugly, but ran crookedly here and there, up and down hills, round the little indented bays of the sea, with houses standing sometimes angularly, sometimes with gables to the roadway. And the houses were all covered with green turf, with turf that at this time of the year was growing, – a mode of roofing which gave a singularly picturesque appearance to the place.
“The turf is used as a protection against snow, and is a protection of which the ‘Mastiffs’ saw more when they found themselves in Iceland. That it should have been found necessary here I am surprised, as Thorshavn though it lies between 61 and 62 N.L., is not a place of very much snow. The climate is moist and foggy, and storms are frequent; but the winters are not severe. The frost lasts hardly beyond a month, and the harbours are seldom icebound. But there are the houses covered with grass, giving to the place from a little distance the appearance of a town under the sods.
“When we had perambulated the streets we were taken up to a little hill over the town so that we might look down upon and see the nature of its situation and its structure. Thorshavn lies all around various little nooks of the sea, and has the smell and flavour of the sea which is peculiar to such places. It is very pretty, but its smell and flavour, combining that of many fishes, is one to which the visitor must become accustomed before it will be palatable. There is certainly the ancient and the fish-like smell; – otherwise Thorshavn is delightful.
“There are, I was told, about 10,000 inhabitants in the islands, of which the capital holds about 900. Looking at statistics composed as to the Faroes about twenty-five years ago, I find the number of the people given as 8,150 for the group altogether, and 1,500 for the capital.…The cultivation is very poor, the ground being too rocky for the general use of ploughs. Horses and cattle are rare. The wealth of the farmers consists in their sheep. The sheep, however, are never housed, and the wool is torn from their backs instead of being shorn. Here, as at St. Kilda, there is a great enterprise of bird-catching, for the sake of the flesh as well as the feathers. There seemed to be little or no poverty. A good carpenter in Thorshavn would earn 4s. a week; in other parts of the islands a moderate carpenter would earn 2s. They use Danish coins, of which the crown contains 100 farthings; this crown is worth something over as. The people generally are healthy; the girls appear to be remarkably strong. But here again I was told that rheumatism prevails.
“When we descended from the hill… to see the church. It was now considerably past midnight, and yet there seemed to be no difficulty in finding the key. The church was spacious, – not at all unlike one of our own ugly churches, with pews, and a gallery, and an organ. It seemed to me to be larger than would be wanted in England for a population of 900; but it is probably the case that a larger proportion of the population attends Divine service than is the case with ourselves. It was evident that they were proud of their church, and that they who accompanied us were anxious that we should see it.”
Although the Faroese appear much more Danish than the Icelanders–they have adopted the Danish system easily, the language, the coins, the postal service, the government appointments, and they appear to be better off–there is much similarity with Iceland. Some are in the details Trollope mentions.
Neither shear sheep. They pull off loose wool. It is an odd, wasteful practice that results in poor quality wool even though wool is a major trading item. If North American Icelandic beliefs about Iceland being held back because of lack of contact with more efficient ways of doing things were true, one could understand sheep not being sheared. It could be assumed the Faroese and Icelanders simply didn’t know that sheep should be sheared. However, the oddity of the practice of pulling off loose wool is such that not only does Trollope mention it but so do any number of other English travellers. One has to assume that the travellers mentioned it to people in both the Faroes and Iceland. Nearly every account of travels in Iceland states that wealth is not in silver but in sheep. The practice would seem to be more about attitude, a crippling refusal to change that Laxness repeatedly mentions in his novels,  than lack of knowledge.
Faroese buildings, like Icelandic ones, have turf roofs. Again, Trollope’s eye for detail, that essential quality of the novelist, notes both the turf roofs and the incongruity of them for there are other roofing materials available. In Iceland, he will see a situation where the people have no choice but to use sod, where wood is so scarce that whale ribs are used as roof beams.
Trollope notes that the streets of Thorshavn won’t accommodate wheeled vehicles. The stop in the Faroes prepares the travellers for Iceland, a country with hardly any attempt at building roads where everything, even the dead, are moved on horseback.
The major difference is that the climate is milder and Trollope makes note of it. Oats and barley will ripen. However, the winds can be fierce, so fierce that it actually strips away sod. In Iceland, the ripening of grain stopped far back in history. The one crop is grass. The Icelanders, like the Faroese, cut sod and dry it for fuel because fuel of any kind is in such short supply. In Iceland, it is so scarce that farmhouses are not heated. In the Faroes, the houses are heated but Trollope notes that the use of sod for fuel relentlessly reduces the pasture for the sheep.
This brief stop gives the travellers a preview of what is to come. Trollope, the famous writer, is the guest of Mr. John Burns, the owner of the Cunard Lines. He comes in luxury, the guest of a man who lives in a castle, a member of the nobility, the kind of successful businessman who can afford to take sixteen people on a yacht the size of the Mastiff.  A man who can afford to be both demanding and generous. One gets the impression that these tourists are no more enlightened about the condition of life for those outside their social class than today’s tourists on a cruise that stops at various ports of call. They look at the sights and buy local souvenirs. It may be when they return home, that in describing the people they saw, they will use the word “quaint”.
Trollope, used to upper class English society, a society in which he has made a place for himself among the rich and powerful, can’t help but see, because he is a novelist, what people’s lives are like. However, he is writing about the trip as a gesture of friendship to John Burns so the account of the trip must please his patron. There is no curiosity about the “peasants”, no visits to the earth like hovels like those Ida Pfeiffer made. There’s no point in complaining that Trollope isn’t Dickens. After all, none of the passengers would have any reason to enter the hovels of the local peasants in the areas from which they came. Why would they when abroad? Money shields the Mastiffs from daily reality. However, Anthony Trollope had a keen eye, and from some of his observations, one might expect that he had much to think about after he had his nightly whiskey and water and went to bed.
(Quotes from How the Mastiffs Went to Iceland)